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Tech journalist since the dark ages. Windows Secrets, LangaList newsletter, Windows Magazine (NetGuide, Home PC), Byte, Popular Computing, yadda yadda yadda. Google me, if it matters.

This feed is mostly personal interest; it's NOT my professional writing. There's tech here, yes, but also lots of general science and some politics and weird humor thrown in.

Friday, February 11, 2011

Cut-and-paste leaves recoverable data behind

As usual, my regular weekly Windows Secrets column answers four reader-submitted questions.

This week:

  • Cut-and-paste leaves recoverable data behind: If you're concerned about deleted-data security, you need to think about what happens when you move or cut-and-paste files. It takes an extra step or two, but free software — including two little-known tools from Microsoft — can make all your deleted data safe from data snoops, regardless of how the files were originally deleted.

  • What's this "ASP.NET" user sign-in screen?: Reader Ax Kramer found a new user account on his PC — one he doesn't recall ever setting up.

  • Running Flash Player on 64-bit Windows: Why does Adobe hide the app?

  • Removing the unwelcome Widgi Toolbar: Reader Dave Marshall got stuck with some nasty foistware.
Full issue rundown:

The following link includes all articles this week: http://WindowsSecrets.com/comp/110210

Free content posted on Feb. 10, 2011:

 
You get all of the following in our paid content:

LANGALIST PLUS
By Fred Langa

Cut-and-paste leaves recoverable data behind
If you're concerned about deleted-data security, you need to think about what happens when you move or cut-and-paste files. It takes an extra step or two, but free software — including two little-known tools from Microsoft — can make all your deleted data safe from data snoops, regardless of how the files were originally deleted.

In this story


Security concerns about moved files
What's this "ASP.NET" user sign-in screen?
Running Flash Player on 64-bit Windows
Removing the unwelcome Widgi Toolbar

BEST PRACTICES
By Michael Lasky

Free online tax prep — benefits and risks
In this time of tight budgets, paying to pay seems especially galling. The good news is that many of us can use a free IRS service to calculate our contribution to the Feds — but you still have to do some homework

In this story


A not-so-gentle push to online filing
Free comes with limitations, both big and small
Tax preparation designed for ease of use
Paid tax-prep services provide flexibility
TurboTax versus H&R Block — a near tie

PATCH WATCH
By Susan Bradley

Don't send roses, send the gift of patches
Internet Explorer brings us a digital Valentine in the form of a security update. Install it on all the PCs you love. An unusual non-security patch might mean we can kiss off malware automatically running off flash drives, too.

In this story


Big February fix for Internet Explorer
A fix for the malicious thumbnails threat
Fonts in folders bring February attacks
Gaining toeholds onto systems via kernal flaws
Flash drives no longer support Autorun
Adobe adds its updates to Patch Tuesday
Browsing could lead to information disclosure
More patches to prepare systems for Win7 SP1
Server admins get patches for Web services

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Each month, we send a full year of sponsorship to a different child. Your contributions in January are helping us to sponsor Keith, a twelve-year-old boy from Zambia. Children International channels development aid from donors to Keith and his community. We also sponsor kids through Save the Children. More info

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